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Search keyword(s): ' Wes D. Gehring'
 
A Cuppy-ful of Laughter--and Sorrow Wes D. Gehring
Category: Mass Media Published: September 2011
Author of The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody and other darkly comic works, humorist Will Cuppy ultimately took his own life, but not before delighting readers with his biting and, at time, nihilistic wit.
 
America's Misunderstood Patriot Wes D. Gehring
Category: USA Yesterday Published: July 2011
When Charlie Chaplin was denigrated by narrow-minded, history-impaired "love-it-or-leave-it" type Americans, his victimizaiton showed, as in so much of life, that the enemy quite often is on this side of the fence. . . .
 
Analyzing Those Movies within Movies Wes D. Gehring
Category: Mass Media Published: November 2010
". . . Although critics sometimes are accused of 'reading' too much into a film, there often is a great deal hidden in plain sight."
 
Baseball Diamonds Are a Girl's (and Boy's) Best (and Most Devout) Friend Wes D. Gehring
Category: Sportscene Published: March 2016
"I've tried 'em all--I really have--and the church that feeds the soul, day in, day out, is the church of baseball."
 
Blacklist Beauties Worth Savoring Wes D. Gehring
Category: Mass Media Published: May 2012
The beauty of "High Noon" and "Kiss Me Deadly," as in all art that taps into universal truths, is that the viewer could miss every metaphorical McCarthy-era Cold War subtext and still savor the films on a purely mind candy entertainment level.
 
Bunny to Buster: Beyond Just Bookends to Silent Film Comedy Wes D. Gehring
Category: Entertainment Published: September 2016
"While [John] Bunny helped inaugurate the silent screen clown, Buster Keaton later became the only real artistic rival to Charlie Chaplin's alter ego Tramp."
 
Everybody Loves Lou (and Coop, Too) Wes D. Gehring
Category: Mass Media Published: September 2010
"The Pride of the Yankees," with populist prototype Gary Cooper playing Lou Gehrig, the iconic Iron Horse, still has the ability to make grown men cry.
 
Getting Serious Wes D. Gehring
Category: Entertainment Published: January 2009
". . . The strongest argument for letting comedians play darker parts is that, despite the stereotype concerning tragedy's superiority, many would argue that comedy is more significant."
 
James Dean: 50 Years After his Death Wes D. Gehring
Category: Entertainment Published: May 2005
The actor "was not the aimless angst-ridden youth he played in the movies. . . . He was not that suffering, rudderless figure in real life."
 
On the Road Again Wes D. Gehring
Category: Cinema Published: January 2012
". . . However you choose to 'read' your road movie map, may all your film trips be enlightening."
 
Teaming Up to Be Funny Wes D. Gehring
Category: Entertainment Published: November 2016
The gang's all here: Laurel and Hardy, the Marx Brothers, Abbott and Costello, The Three Stooges, Hope and Crosby, and Martin and Lewis."
 
The Darker the Merrier Wes D. Gehring
Category: Mass Media Published: March 2012
Dexter is a serial killer in a cable television program that evokes the best elements of cinima's persistent pursuit of black comedy.
 
The Miracle Behind "The Miracle" Wes D. Gehring
Category: Entertainment Published: January 2015
Preston Sturges always was predisposed to skewering Populist films--and there is no better example than "The Miracle of Morgan's Creek."
 
The Politics of Political Films Wes D. Gehring
Category: Mass Media Published: September 2008
As Mark Twain once observed, "It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly native American criminal class except Congress."
 
The Shadow of 1957 Wes D. Gehring
Category: Mass Media Published: January 2017
"Today, every year seems life 1957, except now the warning often appears to apply more to political products. Satire can be a savior here, but it would help if the human herd seemingly did not so need this empty prattle."
 
The Tramp's Influence on Television Wes D. Gehring
Category: Entertainment Published: July 2015
" Three of [TV's] iconic figures (Lucille Ball, Red Skelton, and Dick Van Dyke) have character-defining material drawn directly from 'Modern Times.'"